Deep Look

Deep Look
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DEEP LOOK is a science video series that explores big science by going very, very small, from KQED and PBS Digital Studios.

We use macro photography and microscopy in glorious 4K resolution, to see science up close... really, really close.

* NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! *

SUBSCRIBE: http://goo.gl/8NwXqt

On Twitter:

Lauren Sommer: Host/Writer @lesommer
Joshua Cassidy: Lead Producer / Cinematographer @Jkcassidy
Teodros Hailye: Animator
Elliott Kennerson: Producer / Editor @elliott_KQED
Gabriela Quiros: Coordinating Producer
Craig Rosa: Series Producer @craigrosa
Seth G. Samuel: Composer @sethgsamuel
Kia Simon: Editor and Motion Graphics: @KiaSimon

Like hummingbirds? Slugs? Owls? Squid? Mosquitoes? See the unseen and discover wildlife, biology, chemistry, and nature videos.

--
KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media.

You've Heard of a Murder of Crows. How About a Crow Funeral? | Deep Look

Support Deep Look on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook They may be dressed in black, but crow funerals aren't the solemn events that we hold for our dead. These birds cause a ruckus around their fallen friend. Are they just scared, or is there something deeper going on? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * It’s a common site in many parks and backyards: Crows squawking. But groups of the noisy black birds may not just be raising a fuss, scientists say. They may be holding a funeral. Kaeli Swift, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Washington’s Avian Conservation Lab in Seattle, is studying how crows learn about danger from each other and how they respond to seeing one of their own who has died. Unlike the majority of animals, crows react strongly to seeing a fellow member of their species has died, mobbing together and raising a ruckus. Only a few animals like whales, elephants and some primates, have such strong reactions. To study exactly what may be going on on, Swift developed an experiment that involved exposing local crows in Seattle neighborhoods to a dead taxidermied crow in order to study their reaction. “It’s really incredible,” she said. “They’re all around in the trees just staring at you and screaming at you.” Swift calls these events ‘crow funerals’ and they are the focus of her research. --- What do crows eat? Crows are omnivores so they’ll eat just about anything. In the wild they eat insects, carrion, eggs seeds and fruit. Crows that live around humans eat garbage. --- What’s the difference between crows and ravens? American crows and common ravens may look similar but ravens are larger with a more robust beak. When in flight, crow tail feathers are approximately the same length. Raven tail feathers spread out and look like a fan. Ravens also tend to emit a croaking sound compared to the caw of a crow. Ravens also tend to travel in pairs while crows tend to flock together in larger groups. Raven will sometimes prey on crows. --- Why do crows chase hawks? Crows, like animals whose young are preyed upon, mob together and harass dangerous predators like hawks in order to exclude them from an area and protect their offspring. Mobbing also teaches new generations of crows to identify predators. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1923458/youve-heard-of-a-murder-of-crows-how-about-a-crow-funeral/ ---+ For more information: Kaeli Swift’s Corvid Research website https://corvidresearch.blog/ University of Washington Avian Conservation Laboratory http://sefs.washington.edu/research.acl/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Why Do Tumbleweeds Tumble? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dATZsuPdOnM Upside-Down Catfish Doesn't Care What You Think | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eurCBOJMrsE Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-0SFWPLaII ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! Why Climate Change is Unjust | Hot Mess https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5KjpYK12_c Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal? | Origin Of Everything https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxIOGqHQqZM How the Squid Lost Its Shell | PBS Eons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4vxoP-IF2M ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

1 semana atrás

Why Do Tumbleweeds Tumble? | Deep Look

The silent star of classic Westerns is a plant on a mission. It starts out green and full of life. It even grows flowers. But to reproduce effectively, it needs to turn into a rolling brown skeleton. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt Sign up for our Deep Look Newsletter: https://www.kqed.org/science/deep-look-newsletter/ DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Tumbleweeds might be the iconic props of classic Westerns. But in real life, they’re not only a noxious weed, but one that moves around. Pushed by gusts of wind, they can overwhelm entire neighborhoods, as happened recently in Victorville, California, or become a threat for drivers and an expensive nuisance for farmers. “They tumble across highways and can cause accidents,” said Mike Pitcairn, who tracks tumbleweeds at the California Department of Food and Agriculture in Sacramento. “They pile up against fences and homes.” And tumbleweeds aren’t even originally from the West. Genetic tests have shown that California’s most common tumbleweed, known as Russian thistle, likely came from Ukraine, said retired plant population biologist Debra Ayres, who studied tumbleweeds at the University of California, Davis. A U.S. Department of Agriculture employee, L. H. Dewey, wrote in 1893 that Russian thistle had arrived in the U.S. through South Dakota in flaxseed imported from Europe in the 1870s. “It has been known in Russia many years,” Dewey wrote, “and has quite as bad a reputation in the wheat regions there as it has in the Dakotas.” This is where the name Russian thistle originates, said Ayres, although tumbleweeds aren’t really thistles. The weed spread quickly through the United States — on rail cars, through contamination of agricultural seeds and by tumbling. “They tumble to disperse the seeds,” said Ayres, “and thereby reduce competition.” By bouncing and rolling, a tumbleweed spreads out tens of thousands of seeds so that they all get plenty of sunlight and space. Tumbleweeds grow well in barren places like abandoned agricultural fields, vacant lots or the side of the road, where they can tumble unobstructed and there’s no grass, which their seedlings can’t compete with. --- Where does a tumbleweed come from? Tumbleweeds start out as any plant, attached to the soil. Seedlings, which look like blades of grass with a bright pink stem, sprout at the end of the winter. By summer, Russian thistle plants take on their round shape and grow flowers. Inside each flower, a fruit with a single seed develops. Other plants attract animals with tasty fruits, and get them to carry away their seeds and disperse them when they poop. Tumbleweeds developed a different evolutionary strategy. Starting in late fall, they dry out and die, their seeds nestled between prickly leaves. Gusts of wind easily break dead tumbleweeds from their roots and they roll away, spreading their seeds as they go. --- How big do tumbleweeds grow? Mike Pitcairn, of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, said they can grow to be more than 6 feet tall in parts of the state like the San Joaquin Valley. --- Are tumbleweeds dangerous? Yes. They can cause traffic accidents, and they can be a fire hazard if they pile up against buildings. ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IoOJu2_FKE This Giant Plant Looks Like Raw Meat and Smells Like Dead Rat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycUNj_Hv4_Y Upside-Down Catfish Doesn't Care What You Think https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eurCBOJMrsE ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Above the Noise: Why Is Vaping So Popular? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9zps5LsVXs Hot Mess: What Happened to Nuclear Power? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jEXZZDU6Gk ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

3 semanas atrás

Help Deep Look Win a 2018 Webby Award!

Deep Look is a 🎇2018 WEBBY NOMINEE 🎇 for Best Science & Education Channel!! And in order to win the People's Voice competition, we need your vote! VOTE: https://vote.webbyawards.com/PublicVoting#/2018/film-video/video-channels-networks/science-education For those of you who don't know, the Webbys are kind of like the Oscars of the internet. And you helped us *win* last year - one of our videos "How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood" won Best Science & Education Video of 2017! And we need you - our super awesome fans - to rally us to victory again! VOTE! Seriously! The Webbys are the Oscars of the Internet. Voting ends this Thursday, April 19, at midnight! Do it now. Because time is.... TICKING. Thanks! -- The Deep Look team DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the David B. Gold Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

1 mês atrás

Upside-Down Catfish Doesn't Care What You Think

You might suppose this catfish is sick, or just confused. But swimming belly-up actually helps it camouflage and breathe better than its right-side-up cousins. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Normally, an upside-down fish in your tank is bad news. As in, it’s time for a new goldfish. That’s because most fish have an internal air sac called a “swim bladder” that allows them to control their buoyancy and orientation. They fill the bladder with air when they want to rise, and deflate it when they want to sink. Fish without swim bladders, like sharks, have to swim constantly to keep from dropping to the bottom. If an aquarium fish is listing to one side or flops over on its back, it often means it has swim bladder disease, a potentially life-threatening condition usually brought on parasites, overfeeding, or high nitrate levels in the water. But for a few remarkable fish, being upside-down means everything is great. In fact, seven species of catfish native to Central Africa live most of their lives upended. These topsy-turvy swimmers are anatomically identical to their right-side up cousins, despite having such an unusual orientation. People’s fascination with the odd alignment of these fish goes back centuries. Studies of these quizzical fish have found a number of reasons why swimming upside down makes a lot of sense. In an upside-down position, fish produce a lot less wave drag. That means upside-down catfish do a better job feeding on insect larvae at the waterline than their right-side up counterparts, who have to return to deeper water to rest. There’s something else at the surface that’s even more important to a fish’s survival than food: oxygen. The gas essential to life readily dissolves from the air into the water, where it becomes concentrated in a thin layer at the waterline — right where the upside-down catfish’s mouth and gills are perfectly positioned to get it. Scientists estimate that upside-down catfishes have been working out their survival strategy for as long at 35 million years. Besides their breathing and feeding behavior, the blotched upside-down catfish from the Congo Basin has also evolved a dark patch on its underside to make it harder to see against dark water. That coloration is remarkable because it’s the opposite of most sea creatures, which tend to be darker on top and lighter on the bottom, a common adaptation called “countershading” that offsets the effects of sunlight. The blotched upside-down catfish’s “reverse” countershading has earned it the scientific name negriventris, which means black-bellied. --- How many kinds of fish swim upside down? A total of seven species in Africa swim that way. Upside-down swimming may have evolved independent in a few of the species – and at least one more time in a catfish from Asia. --- How do fish stay upright? They have an air-filled swim bladder on the inside that that they can fill or deflate to maintain balance or to move up or down in the water column. --- What are the benefits of swimming upside down? Upside down, a fish swims more efficiently at the waterline, where there’s more oxygen and better access to some prey. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1922038/the-mystery-of-the-upside-down-catfish ---+ For more information: The California Academy of Sciences has upside-down catfish in its aquarium collection: https://www.calacademy.org/exhibits/steinhart-aquarium ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning https://youtu.be/O-0SFWPLaII This Is Why Water Striders Make Terrible Lifeguards https://youtu.be/E2unnSK7WTE ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! PBS Eons: What a Dinosaur Looks Like Under a Microscope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rvgiDXc12k Origin of Everything: The Origin of Race in the USA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CVxAlmAPHec ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

1 mês atrás

Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning | Deep Look

Deep Look is 🎇 2018 🎇WEBBY NOMINEE 🎇 for Best Science & Education Video Channel 📹 ! Please VOTE now! https://vote.webbyawards.com/PublicVoting#/2018/film-video/video-channels-networks/science-education For those of you who don't know, the Webbys are kind of like the Oscars of the internet. We can't do it without you. Thanks! --- (FYI - This episode is a *bit* more bloody that usual – especially a little after the 2-minute mark. Just letting you know in case flesh wounds aren’t your thing) The same blood-sucking leeches feared by hikers and swimmers are making a comeback... in hospitals. Once used for questionable treatments, leeches now help doctors complete complex surgeries to reattach severed body parts. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Leeches get a bad rap—but they might not deserve it. Yes, they’re creepy crawly blood-suckers. And they can instill an almost primal sense of disgust and revulsion. Humphrey Bogart’s character in the 1951 film The African Queen even went so far as to call them “filthy little devils.” But the humble leech is making a comeback. Contrary to the typical, derogatory definition of a human “leech,” this critter is increasingly playing a key role as a sidekick for scientists and doctors, simply by being its bloodthirsty self. Distant cousins of the earthworm, most leech species are parasites that feed on the blood of animals and humans alike. They are often found in freshwater and navigate either by swimming or by inching themselves along, using two suckers—one at each end of their body—to anchor themselves. Upon reaching an unsuspecting host, a leech will surreptitiously attach itself and begin to feed. It uses a triangular set of three teeth to cut in, and secretes a suite of chemicals to thin the blood and numb the skin so its presence goes undetected. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1921659/take-two-leeches-and-call-me-in-the-morning ---+ For more information: David Weisblat at UC Berkeley studies leeches development and evolution https://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/weisblat/research.html Biologists recently reported that leeches in that region can provide a valuable snapshot of which animals are present in a particular area https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14772000.2018.1433729?journalCode=tsab20& ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NpJNeGqExrc For Pacific Mole Crabs It's Dig or Die | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfoYD8pAsMw Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHf47gI8w04&t=83s ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Above the Noise: Cow Burps Are Warming the Planet | Reactions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnRFUSGz_ZM What a Dinosaur Looks Like Under a Microscope | Eons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rvgiDXc12k Hawking Radiation | Space Time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPKj0YnKANw ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

1 mês atrás

How Ticks Dig In With a Mouth Full of Hooks | Deep Look

Why can't you just flick a tick? Because it attaches to you with a mouth covered in hooks, while it fattens up on your blood. For days. But don't worry – there *is* a way to pull it out. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Spring is here. Unfortunately for hikers and picnickers out enjoying the warmer weather, the new season is prime time for ticks, which can transmit bacteria that cause Lyme disease. How they latch on – and stay on – is a feat of engineering that scientists have been piecing together. Once you know how a tick’s mouth works, you understand why it’s impossible to simply flick a tick. The key to their success is a menacing mouth covered in hooks that they use to get under the surface of our skin and attach themselves for several days while they fatten up on our blood. “Ticks have a lovely, evolved mouth part for doing exactly what they need to do, which is extended feeding,” said Kerry Padgett, supervising public health biologist at the California Department of Public Health in Richmond. “They're not like a mosquito that can just put their mouth parts in and out nicely, like a hypodermic needle.” Instead, a tick digs in using two sets of hooks. Each set looks like a hand with three hooked fingers. The hooks dig in and wriggle into the skin. Then these “hands” bend in unison to perform approximately half-a-dozen breaststrokes that pull skin out of the way so the tick can push in a long stubby part called the hypostome. “It’s almost like swimming into the skin,” said Dania Richter, a biologist at the Technische Universität in Braunschweig, Germany, who has studied the mechanism closely. “By bending the hooks it’s engaging the skin. It’s pulling the skin when it retracts.” The bottom of their long hypostome is also covered in rows of hooks that give it the look of a chainsaw. Those hooks act like mini-harpoons, anchoring the tick to us for the long haul. “They’re teeth that are backwards facing, similar to one of those gates you would drive over but you're not allowed to back up or else you'd puncture your tires,” said Padgett. --- How to remove a tick. Kerry Padgett, at the California Department of Public Health, recommends grabbing the tick close to the skin using a pair of fine tweezers and simply pulling straight up. “No twisting or jerking,” she said. “Use a smooth motion pulling up.” Padgett warned against using other strategies. “Don't use Vaseline or try to burn the tick or use a cotton swab soaked in soft soap or any of these other techniques that might take a little longer or might not work at all,” she said. “You really want to remove the tick as soon as possible.” --- What happens if the mouth of a tick breaks off in your skin? Don’t worry if the tick’s mouth parts stay behind when you pull. “The mouth parts are not going to transmit disease to people,” said Padgett. If the mouth stayed behind in your skin, it will eventually work its way out, sort of like a splinter does, she said. Clean the bite area with soap and water and apply antibiotic ointment. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://www.kqed.org/science/1920972/how-ticks-dig-in-with-a-mouth-full-of-hooks ---+ For more information: Centers for Disease Control information on Lyme disease: https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/ Mosquito & Vector Control District for San Mateo County, California: https://www.smcmvcd.org/ticks ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU So … Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWdCMFvgFbo Meet the Dust Mites, Tiny Roommates That Feast On Your Skin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACrLMtPyRM0 ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Above the Noise: Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l0cjsZS-eM It’s Okay To Be Smart: Inside an ICE CAVE! - Nature's Most Beautiful Blue https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7LKm9jtm8I ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

2 meses atrás

So ... Sometimes Fireflies Eat Other Fireflies | Deep Look

Most firefly flashes are pure romance, a sexy form of skywriting. But one variety copies the mating signals of others to lure them to their demise. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. Most of the blinking signals that fireflies send out are intended to attract mates. But researchers are finding out that in some cases, these romantic overtures are not all wine and roses. Females of one firefly group, the genus Photuris, have learned to copy other fireflies’ flashes to attract the males of those species. When one arrives, she pounces, first sucking his blood, then devouring his insides. These “femme fatale” fireflies live throughout the Eastern U.S alongside the fireflies they target. They can develop widely varying light shows to target whatever species are in the area. The predatory habits of Photuris are just one example of how much individual firefly signals can differ from one another. The male Common Eastern Firefly, for example, is known for his fish hook-shaped aerial maneuver, which he repeats at six-second intervals. That characteristic move has earned the species the nickname “Big Dipper.” The male Big Dipper hopes this bit of skywriting will get him noticed by females hiding in the grass. If the female likes what she sees, her reply comes as a single pulse from her smaller, heart-shaped lantern. That’s his invitation to land and mate. Most firefly interactions follow the same pattern, with roving males advertising themselves to concealed females. Within a species, the back-and-forth signals are so reliable that it’s easy to attract the male fireflies with even a simple decoy. Firefly light is biochemical. But fireflies like the Big Dippers do much more with chemistry than just make light. They can mix together an array of other compounds, including invisible pheromones for mating, and others called lucibufagins (“loosa-BOOF-ajins”) that ward off predators like spiders and birds. At some point, the Photuris “femme fatale” fireflies lost the ability to make their own lucibufagins. So instead of chemistry, these bigger, stronger fireflies became adept at imitation, and evolved to turn into insect vampires to take these valuable compounds from other fireflies to boost their own defenses. And it works. In experiments, predators avoided Photuris fireflies that had recently preyed on other fireflies. --- Where do fireflies live? There are fireflies worldwide, but in the U.S., you’ll find them in the Midwest and Eastern U.S. There are a few species in the West, including the California Pink Glow-worm. --- Why do fireflies flash? Mostly, it’s to attract mates. One sex, usually the male, uses a more elaborate flash pattern to get the attention of the opposite sex. Then the female signals her interest with a simpler flash. --- Why do fireflies glow after they die? The chemicals in the firefly that make light, luciferin and luciferase, remain viable after it dies, and the reaction that creates the light thrives on oxygen, which is of course plentiful in the air. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/2018/02/27/so-sometimes-fireflies-eat-other-fireflies ---+ For more information: Join Fireflyers International: https://fireflyersinternational.net/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Snail Sex https://youtu.be/UOcLaI44TXA Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker https://youtu.be/NpJNeGqExrc ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! PBS Eons: When Giant Fungi Ruled https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-G64DagHuOg Origin Of Everything: Why Do We Eat Artificial Flavors? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNaJ31EV13U ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

2 meses atrás

This Giant Plant Looks Like Raw Meat and Smells Like Dead Rat | Deep Look

With rows of Dr. Seuss-like flowers hidden deep inside, the corpse flower plays dead to lure some unusual pollinators. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * For a plant that emits an overpowering stench of rotting carcass, you’d think the corpse flower would have a PR problem. But it’s quite the opposite: Anytime a corpse flower opens up at a botanical garden somewhere in the world visitors flock to catch a whiff and get a glimpse of the giant plant, which can grow up to 10 feet tall when it blooms and generally only does so every two to 10 years. A corpse flower’s whole survival strategy is based on deception. It’s not a flower and it’s not a rotting dead animal, but it mimics both. Pollination remains out of sight, deep within the plant. KQED’s Deep Look staff was able to film inside a corpse flower, revealing the rarely-seen moment when the plant’s male flowers release glistening strings of pollen. It’s not that the corpse flower is the only plant to attract pollinators like flies and beetles by putting out bad smells. Nor is it the only one that produces male and female flowers at the same time. “The fact that it does all of this at this outsized scale – all of this together – is what’s so unique about it, biologically,” said Pati Vitt, senior scientist at the Chicago Botanic Garden. When a titan arum is ready to flower, a stalk starts to grow out of the soil. Once it has reached four to 10 feet, a red “skirt” unfurls. Though it has the appearance of a petal, it’s really a modified leaf called a spathe that looks like a raw steak. The yellow stalk underneath is called the spadix and it gives the plant its scientific name, Amorphophallus titanum, or roughly “giant deformed phallus.” In its native Sumatra, the corpse flower opens for only 24 hours. In captivity, it often lasts longer. With just a day to reproduce, the stakes are high. --- How many chemicals make up the smell of the corpse flower? More than 30 chemicals make up the scent of the corpse flower, according to the 2017 paper “Studies on the floral anatomy and scent chemistry of titan arum” by researchers at the University of Mississippi, University of Florida, Gainsville, and Anadolu University in Turkey: http://journals.tubitak.gov.tr/botany/issues/bot-17-41-1/bot-41-1-6-1604-34.pdf Some of the chemicals have a pleasant scent. But mostly, the corpse flower at first smells like funky cheese and rotting garlic, as a result of sulphur-smelling compounds. Hours later, the stink changes to what Vanessa Handley, at the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley describes as “dead rat in the walls of your house.” ---+ Read the entire article: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2018/01/23/this-giant-plant-looks-like-raw-meat-and-smells-like-dead-rat/ ---+ For more information: Great illustration on the lifecycle of the corpse flower by the Chicago Botanic Garden: https://www.chicagobotanic.org/titan/faq University of California Davis Botanical Conservatory: http://greenhouse.ucdavis.edu/conservatory/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: This Mushroom Starts Killing You Before You Even Realize It https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl9aCH2QaQY A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6a3Q5DzeBM ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! It’s Okay To Be Smart: How to Figure Out the Day of the Week For Any Date Ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=714LTMNJy5M Above The Noise: Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB_h7aheAEM ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED.

4 meses atrás

Why the Male Black Widow is a Real Home Wrecker | Deep Look

Sure, the female black widow has a terrible reputation. But who’s the real victim here? Her male counterpart is a total jerk — and might just be getting what he deserves. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. We’ve all heard the stories. She mates and then kills. Her venom is 15 times stronger than a rattlesnake’s. One bite could kill you. With a shiny black color and a glaring red hourglass stomach, she has long inspired fear and awe. But most species of widow spider (there are 31), including the western black widow found in the U.S., don’t kill their mates at all. Only two widow spider species always eat their mate, the Australian redback and the brown widow, an invasive species in California. And the male seems to be asking for it. In both of these species, he offers himself to her, somersaulting into her mouth after copulation. He may even deserve it. During peak mating season, thousands of males will prowl around looking for females. Females set up their webs, stay put and wait. Once the male arrives at her silken abode, he starts to wreck it, systematically disassembling her web one strand at a time. In a process scientists call web reduction, he bunches it into a little ball and wraps it up with his own silk. Then, while mating, he will wrap her in fine strands that researchers refer to as the bridal veil. He drapes his silk over her legs, where her smell receptors are most concentrated. After all of that, he is most likely to crawl away, alive and unscathed. --- Why does the black widow spider eat her mate? No one really knows, but scientists assume his body supplies her with nutrition for laying eggs. Sometimes she eats him by accident, not recognizing him as a mate. --- How harmful are black widows to people? We couldn’t find a documented case of a human death from a black widow spider in the U.S., but a bite will make you sick with extreme flu-like symptoms. Luckily, black widows aren’t aggressive to people. --- Why do black widows have a red hourglass? It’s a warning sign, a phenomenon common in nature that scientists call aposematicism, which is the use of color to ward off enemies. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2018/01/09/why-the-male-black-widow-is-a-real-home-wrecker ---+ For more information: Black widow researcher Catherine Scott’s website: http://spiderbytes.org/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el_lPd2oFV4 Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Snail Sex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOcLaI44TXA ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Origin of Everything: Why Does Santa Wear Red? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fajNM5OPVnA PBS Eons: 'Living Fossils' Aren't Really a Thing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPvZj2KcjAY ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by HopeLab, The David B. Gold Foundation; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

4 meses atrás

Praying Mantis Love is Waaay Weirder Than You Think | Deep Look

These pocket-sized predators are formidable hunters. But when it comes to hooking up, male mantises have good reason to fear commitment. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * Mike Maxwell recently finished a ninth season studying the love life of the praying mantises that live around Bishop, a town in California’s Eastern Sierra. Over that time, he’s seen some unsettlingly strange behaviors. It’s pretty common knowledge that female mantises sometimes eat males during or after mating — a habit that biologists call “sexual cannibalism.” But among the bordered mantises that Maxwell researches, it gets weirder than that. As it turns out, when a male mantis loses his head, it doesn’t mean he loses the urge to procreate. You read that right. Not only can some male bordered mantises continue mating even while being attacked by their female counterparts, some males are able to mount a female and initiate mating even after getting their heads completely bitten off. “It’s a really weird, strange behavior,” said Maxwell, “So what’s going on? Why do they do it?” -- What do praying mantises eat? Praying mantises are mostly ambush predators that typically eat small animals like grasshoppers, crickets, bees, crickets and butterflies . They use camouflage to hide themselves and wait for their prey to come within striking distance. Then they use their raptorial forelimbs to grab their prey. Spikes on their forelimbs help them hold their prey while they eat. -- Why do praying mantises eat each other? Female praying mantises sometimes eat males that approach them to mate. They are only able to do this because mantises are predators and the female mantises are bigger and stronger than the males. -- Do praying mantises bite? Most mantises will not bite people but they will pinch people with their forelimbs to defend themselves. It feels a lot like getting bit, trust me. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/11/14/praying-mantis-love-is-waaay-weirder-than-you-think-deep-look/ ---+ For more information: Dr. Michael Maxwell, National University https://www.nu.edu/OurPrograms/CollegeOfLettersAndSciences/MathematicsAndNaturalSciences/Faculty/MichelRMaxwell.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: It’s a Goopy Mess When Pines and Beetles Duke it Out | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wR5O48zsbnc These Whispering, Walking Bats Are Onto Something | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2py029bwhA&t=3s There's Something Very Fishy About These Trees ... | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZWiWh5acbE&t=1s ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! How Your Rubber Ducky Explains Colonialism | Origin of Everything https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWjzOcIIxgM When Whales Walked | PBS Eons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OSRKtT_9vw The Cheerios Effect | It’s OK To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbKAwk-OG_w ---+ Follow KQED Science KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

6 meses atrás

It’s a Goopy Mess When Pines and Beetles Duke it Out | Deep Look

An onslaught of tiny western pine beetles can bring down a mighty ponderosa pine. But the forest fights back by waging a sticky attack of its own. Who will win the battle in the bark? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * Bark beetles are specialized, with each species attacking only one or a few species of trees. Ponderosa pines are attacked by dark brown beetles the size of a grain of rice called western pine beetles (Dendroctonus brevicomis). In the spring and summer, female western pine beetles fly around ponderosa pine stands looking for trees to lay their eggs in. As they start boring into a ponderosa, the tree oozes a sticky, viscous clear liquid called resin. If the tree is healthy, it can produce so much resin that the beetle gets exhausted and trapped as the resin hardens, which can kill it. “The western pine beetle is an aggressive beetle that in order to successfully reproduce has to kill the tree,” said U.S. Forest Service ecologist Sharon Hood, based in Montana. “So the tree has very evolved responses. With pines, they have a whole resin duct system. You can imagine these vertical and horizontal pipes.” But during California’s five-year drought, which ended earlier this year, ponderosa pines weren’t getting much water and couldn’t make enough resin to put up a strong defense. Beetles bored through the bark of millions of trees and sent out an aggregating pheromone to call more beetles and stage a mass attack. An estimated 102 million trees – most of them ponderosa – died in California between 2010 and 2016. -- What is resin? Resin – sometimes also called pitch – is a different substance from sap, though trees produce both. Resin is a sticky, viscous liquid that trees exude to heal over wounds and flush out bark beetles, said Sharon Hood, of the Forest Service. Sap, on the other hand, is the continuous water column that the leaves pull up to the top of the tree from its roots. --- Are dead trees a fire hazard? Standing dead trees that have lost their needles don’t increase fire risk, said forest health scientist Jodi Axelson, a University of California extension specialist based at UC Berkeley. But “once they fall to the ground you end up with these very heavy fuel loads,” she said, “and that undoubtedly is going to make fire behavior more intense.” And dead – or living – trees can fall on electric lines and ignite a fire, which is why agencies in California are prioritizing the removal of dead trees near power lines, said Axelson. ---+ Read the entire article about who’s winning the battle between ponderosa pines and western pine beetles in California, on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/10/24/with-california-drought-over-fewer-sierra-pines-dying/ ---+ For more information: Check out the USDA’s “Bark Beetles in California Conifers – Are Your Trees Susceptible?” https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5384837.pdf ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: This Mushroom Starts Killing You Before You Even Realize It https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl9aCH2QaQY&t=57s The Bombardier Beetle And Its Crazy Chemical Cannon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWwgLS5tK80 There’s Something Very Fishy About These Trees … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZWiWh5acbE ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! Vascular Plants = Winning! - Crash Course Biology #37 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9oDTMXM7M8&index=37&list=PL3EED4C1D684D3ADF Julia Child Remixed | Keep On Cooking https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80ZrUI7RNfI ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

7 meses atrás

These Whispering, Walking Bats Are Onto Something | Deep Look

Bats have a brilliant way to find prey in the dark: echolocation. But to many of the moths they eat, that natural sonar is as loud as a jet engine. So some bats have hit on a sneakier, scrappier way to hunt. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * Bats have been the only flying mammals for about 50 million years. Most species, with the exception of the fruit bats, use echolocation -- their built-in sonar -- to detect prey and snatch it from the air. But not pallid bats. They hunt insects and arachnids that live on the ground by tracking their movements with another sense: hearing. In the final moments of their attack, they land and pluck their prey from the ground, a behavior called gleaning. It took millions of years for bats to develop the lethal pairing of flight and echolocation. Why would a bat “go back” to a more primitive hunting style? Many scientists believe the answer may have less to do with the bats alone than with moths, their principal food. In what these scientists describe as an “arms race” of evolution, many moth species have adapted to hear when they’re being tracked and to deploy counter-measures to bat echolocation. These developments have driven some bats to seek alternate means of catching a meal – in part by keeping their sonar volume down. Pallid bats and other so-called “whispering bats” still use their echolocation to navigate. The volume navigational sonar is much quieter, more like a dishwasher. For the pallid bat, part of occupying that niche has also meant evolving immunity scorpion venom. Another arms race. --- Do all bats drink blood? No, only three bat species are exclusive “hemovores” (blood-eaters), and only one of those, the common vampire bat, prefers mammals. --- Why can’t humans hear echolocation? Bat echolocation calls, whether for hunting or navigation – are too high-pitched for our ears to hear. --- Do all bats carry rabies? Only ½ to one percent of bats carry rabies. If a bat seems sick, rabies could be the cause. You should never touch any bat that you find. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/10/10/these-whispering-walking-bats-are-onto-something ---+ For more information: Visit the Razak Lab at UC Riverside: http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~khaleel/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6a3Q5DzeBM How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Origin Of Everything: The True Origin of Killer Clowns https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5_Li2whOHA Physics Girl: Fire in Freefall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VAA_dNq_-8c ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

7 meses atrás

There's Something Very Fishy About These Trees ... | Deep Look

Salmon make a perilous voyage upstream past hungry eagles and bears to mate in forest creeks. When the salmon die, a new journey begins – with maggots. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * For salmon lovers in California, October is “the peak of the return” when hundreds of thousands of Chinook salmon leave the open ocean and swim back to their ancestral streams to spawn and die. All along the Pacific coast, starting in the early summer and stretching as late as December, salmon wait offshore for the right timing to complete their journey inland. In Alaska, the season starts in late June, when salmon head to streams in lush coastal forests. Although this annual migration is welcomed by fishermen who catch the salmon offshore, scientists are finding a much broader and holistic function of the spawning salmon: feeding the forest. Millions of salmon make this migratory journey -- called running -- every year, and their silvery bodies all but obscure the rivers they pass through. This throng of salmon flesh coming into Alaska’s forests is a mass movement of nutrients from the salt waters of the ocean to the forest floor. Decomposing salmon on the sides of streams not only fertilize the soil beneath them, they also provide the base of a complex food web that depends upon them. --- Why Do Salmon Swim Upstream? Salmon run up freshwater streams and rivers to mate. A female salmon will dig a depression in the gravel with her tails and then deposit her eggs in the hole. Male salmon swim alongside the female and release a cloud of sperm at the same. The eggs are fertilized in the running water as the female buries them under a layer of gravel. When the eggs hatch, they spend the first part of their lives hunting and growing in their home stream before heading out to sea to spend their adulthood. --- Why Do Salmon Die After Mating? Salmon typically mate once and then die, though some may return to the sea and come back to mate the subsequent year. Salmon put all of their energy into mating instead of maintaining the salmon’s body for the future. This is a type of mating strategy where adults die after a single mating episode is called semelparity. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/09/26/theres-something-fishy-about-these-trees-deep-look/ ---+ For more information: Bob Armstrong’s Nature Alaska http://www.naturebob.com/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: These Fish Are All About Sex on the Beach | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5F3z1iP0Ic&list=PLdKlciEDdCQDxBs0SZgTMqhszst1jqZhp&index=3 Decorator Crabs Make High Fashion at Low Tide | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwQcv7TyX04 Daddy Longlegs Risk Life ... and Especially Limb ... to Survive | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjDmH8zhp6o ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Beavers: The Smartest Thing in Fur Pants | It’s Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zm6X77ShHa8 How Do Glaciers Move? | It’s Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnlPrdMoQ1Y&t=165s The Smell of Durian Explained | Reactions (ft. BrainCraft, Joe Hanson, Physics Girl & PBS Space Time) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0v0n6tKPLc How Do Glaciers Move? | It’s Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnlPrdMoQ1Y Your Biological Clock at Work | BrainCraft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Q8djfQlYwQ ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the David B. Gold Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

8 meses atrás

A Baby Dragonfly's Mouth Will Give You Nightmares | Deep Look

Dragonflies might rule the skies, but their babies grow up underwater in a larva-eat-larva world. Luckily for them, they have a killer lip that snatches prey, Alien-style, at lightning speed. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * If adult dragonflies are known to be precise hunters, capable of turning on a dime and using their almost-360-degree vision to nab mosquitoes and flies in midair, their dragon-looking babies are even more fearsome. Dragonflies and damselflies lay their eggs in water. After they hatch, their larvae, also known as nymphs, spend months or years underwater growing wings on their backs. Without those versatile four wings that adults use to chase down prey, nymphs rely on a mouthpart they shoot out. It’s like a long, hinged arm that they keep folded under their head and it’s eerily similar to the snapping tongue-like protuberance the alien shoots out at Ripley in the sci-fi movie Aliens. A nymph’s eyesight is almost as precise as an adult dragonfly’s and when they spot something they want to eat, they extrude this mouthpart, called a labium, to engulf, grab, or impale their next meal and draw it back to their mouth. Only dragonfly and damselfly nymphs have this special mouthpart. “It’s like a built-in spear gun,” said Kathy Biggs, the author of guides to the dragonflies of California and the greater Southwest. With their labium, nymphs can catch mosquito larvae, worms and even small fish and tadpoles. “It’s obviously an adaptation to be a predator underwater, where it’s not easy to trap things,” said Dennis Paulson, a dragonfly biologist retired from the University of Puget Sound. Also known among biologists as a “killer lip,” the labium comes in two versions. There’s the spork-shaped labium that scoops up prey, and a flat one with a pair of pincers on the end that can grab or impale aquatic insects. -- How many years have dragonflies been around? Dragonflies have been around for 320 million years, said Ed Jarzembowski, who studies fossil dragonflies at the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology. That means they were here before the dinosaurs. -- How big did dragonflies used to be? Prehistoric dragonflies had a wingspan of 0.7 meters (almost 28 inches). That’s the wingspan of a small hawk today. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/09/12/a-baby-dragonflys-mouth-will-give-you-nightmares/ ---+ For more information: This web site, run by Kathy and David Biggs, has photos and descriptions of California dragonflies and damselflies and information on building a pond to attract the insects to your backyard: http://bigsnest.members.sonic.net/Pond/dragons/ The book "A Dazzle of Dragonflies," by Forrest Mitchell and James Lasswell, has good information on dragonfly nymphs. ---+ More great Deep Look episodes: Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el_lPd2oFV4 This Mushroom Starts Killing You Before You Even Realize It https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl9aCH2QaQY&t=57s Daddy Longlegs Risk Life ... and Especially Limb ... to Survive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjDmH8zhp6o This Is Why Water Striders Make Terrible Lifeguards https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2unnSK7WTE ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from PBS Digital Studios! PBS Eons: The Biggest Thing That Ever Flew https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scAp-fncp64 PBS Infinite Series: A Breakthrough in Higher Dimensional Spheres https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciM6wigZK0w ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration – exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by HopeLab, The David B. Gold Foundation; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

8 meses atrás

Daddy Longlegs Risk Life ... and Especially Limb ... to Survive | Deep Look

When predators attack, daddy longlegs deliberately release their limbs to escape. They can drop up to three and still get by just fine. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK: a new ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. We all know it’s not nice to pull the legs off of bugs. Daddy longlegs don’t wait for that to happen. These arachnids, related to spiders, drop them deliberately. A gentle pinch is enough to trigger an internal system that discharges the leg. Whether it hurts is up for debate, but most scientists think not, given the automatic nature of the defense mechanism. It’s called autotomy, the voluntary release of a body part. Two of their appendages have evolved into feelers, which leaves the other six legs for locomotion. Daddy longlegs share this trait with insects, and have what scientists call the “alternate tripod gate,” where three legs touch the ground at any given point. That elegant stride is initially hard-hit by the loss of a leg. In the daddy longlegs’ case, the lost leg doesn’t grow back. But they persevere: A daddy longlegs that is one, two, or even three legs short can recover a surprising degree of mobility by learning to walk differently. And given time, the daddy longlegs can regain much of its initial mobility on fewer legs. Once these adaptations are better understood, they may have applications in the fields of robotics and prosthetic design. --- Are daddy longlegs a type of spider? No, though they are arachnids, as spiders are. Daddy longlegs are more closely related to scorpions. --- How can I tell a daddy longlegs from a spider? Daddy longlegs have one body segment (like a pea), while spiders have two (like a peanut). Also, you won’t find a daddy longlegs in a web, since they don’t make silk. --- Can a daddy longlegs bite can kill you? Daddy longlegs are not venomous. And despite what you’ve heard about their mouths being too small, they could bite you, but they prefer fruit. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/08/22/daddy-longlegs-risk-life-and-especially-limb-to-survive/ ---+ For more information: Visit the Elias Lab at UC Berkeley: https://nature.berkeley.edu/eliaslab/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Stinging Scorpion vs. Pain-Defying Mouse | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-K_YtWqMro For These Tiny Spiders, It's Sing or Get Served | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7qMqAgCqME ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Gross Science: What Happens When You Get Rabies? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiUUpF1UPJc Physics Girl: Mantis Shrimp Punch at 40,000 fps! - Cavitation Physics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m78_sOEadC8 ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by HopeLab, The David B. Gold Foundation; S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; The Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation; The Vadasz Family Foundation; Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

9 meses atrás

This Is Why Water Striders Make Terrible Lifeguards | Deep Look

They may look serene as they glide across the surface of a stream, but don't be fooled by water striders. They're actually searching for prey for whom a babbling brook quickly becomes an inescapable death trap. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * With the drought officially over and the summer heat upon us, people all across California are heading outdoors. For many, that means a day on the river or relaxing by the lake. The wet winter means there’s plenty of habitat for one of nature’s most curious creatures. Water striders, also called pond skaters, seem to defy gravity. You’ve probably seen them flitting across the water’s surface, dodging ripples as they patrol streams and quiet backwater eddies. Scientists like David Hu at Georgia Institute of Technology study how water striders move and how they make their living as predators lurking on the water’s surface. It’s an amazing combination of biology and physics best understood by looking up close. Very close. --- What are water striders? The common water strider (Gerris lacustris) is an insect typically found in slowly moving freshwater streams and ponds. They are able to move on the water's surface without sinking. They are easy to spot because they create circular waves on the surface of the water. --- How do water striders walk on water? Water tends to stick to itself (cohesion), especially at the surface where it meets the air (surface tension). Water striders don’t weigh very much and they spread their weight out with their long legs. Striders are also covered in microscopic hairs called micro-setae that repel water. Instead of sinking into the water, their legs push down and create dimples. --- What do water striders eat? Water striders are predators and scavengers. They use their ability to walk on water to their advantage, primarily eating other insects that fall into the water at get trapped by the surface tension. A water strider uses its tube-shaped proboscis to penetrate their prey’s exoskeleton, inject digestive enzymes and suck out the prey’s pre-digested innards. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/08/01/this-is-why-water-striders-make-terrible-lifeguards/ ---+ For more information: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v424/n6949/abs/nature01793.html?foxtrotcallback=true ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: These Fish Are All About Sex on the Beach | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5F3z1iP0Ic&list=PLdKlciEDdCQDxBs0SZgTMqhszst1jqZhp&index=3 How Do Pelicans Survive Their Death-Defying Dives? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfEboMmwAMw Decorator Crabs Make High Fashion at Low Tide | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwQcv7TyX04 Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=el_lPd2oFV4&list=PLdKlciEDdCQDxBs0SZgTMqhszst1jqZhp ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Beavers: The Smartest Thing in Fur Pants | It’s Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zm6X77ShHa8 Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above The Noise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB_h7aheAEM How Do Glaciers Move? | It’s Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnlPrdMoQ1Y Your Biological Clock at Work | BrainCraft https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Q8djfQlYwQ ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the David B. Gold Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

9 meses atrás

Why Is The Very Hungry Caterpillar So Dang Hungry? | Deep Look

Because it's hoarding protein. Not just for itself, but for the butterfly it will become and every egg that butterfly will lay. And it's about to lose its mouth... as it wriggles out of its skin during metamorphosis. DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * That caterpillar in your backyard is chewing through your best leaves for a good reason. “Caterpillars have to store up incredible reserves of proteins,” said Carol Boggs, an ecologist at the University of South Carolina. “Nectar doesn’t have much protein. Most of the protein that goes to making eggs has to come from larval feeding.” Caterpillars are the larval stage of a butterfly. Their complete transformation to pupa and then to butterfly is a strategy called holometaboly. Humans are in the minority among animals in that we don’t go through these very distinct, almost separate, lives. We start out as a smaller version of ourselves and grow bigger. But from an evolutionary point of view, the way butterflies transform make sense. “You have a larva that is an eating machine,” said Boggs. “It’s very well-suited to that. Then you’re turning it into a reproduction machine, the butterfly.” Once it becomes a butterfly it will lose its mouth, grow a straw in its place and go on a liquid diet of sugary nectar and rotten fruit juices. Its main job will be to mate and lay eggs. Those eggs started to develop while it was a pupa, using protein that the caterpillar stored by gorging on leaves. We think of leaves as carbohydrates, but the nitrogen they contain makes them more than one quarter protein, said Boggs. -- What are the stages of a butterfly? Insects such as butterflies undergo a complete transformation, referred to by scientists as holometaboly. A holometabolous insect has a morphology in the juvenile state which is different from that in the adult and which undergoes a period of reorganization between the two, said Boggs. The four life stages are egg, larva (caterpillar), pupa (also known as chrysalis) and butterfly. -- What if humans developed like butterflies? “We’d go into a quiescent period when we developed different kind of eating organs and sensory organs,” said Boggs. “It would be as if we went into a pupa and developed straws as mouths and developed more elaborate morphology for smelling and developed wings. It brings up science fiction images.” ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/07/11/why-is-the-very-hungry-caterpillar-so-dang-hungry/ ---+ For more information: Monarch Watch: http://www.monarchwatch.org California Pipevine Swallowtail Project: https://www.facebook.com/CaliforniaPipevineSwallowtail/ A forum organized by Tim Wong, who cares for the butterflies in the California Academy of Sciences’ rainforest exhibit. Wong’s page has beautiful photos and videos of California pipevine swallowtail butterflies at every stage – caterpillar, pupa and butterfly – and tips to create native butterfly habitat. ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: What Gives the Morpho Butterfly Its Magnificent Blue? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29Ts7CsJDpg This Vibrating Bumblebee Unlocks a Flower's Hidden Treasure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZrTndD1H10 Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj8pFX9SOXE In the Race for Life, Which Human Embryos Make It? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mv_kuwQvoc ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! PBS Eons: When Did the First Flower Bloom? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13aUo5fEjNY CrashCourse: The History of Life on Earth - Crash Course Ecology #1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjE-Pkjp3u4 ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

10 meses atrás

A Real Alien Invasion Is Coming to a Palm Tree Near You | Deep Look

The South American palm weevil is bursting onto the scene in California. Its arrival could put one of the state’s most cherished botanical icons at risk of oblivion. DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * Summer means vacation time, and nothing says, “Welcome to paradise!” quite like a palm tree. Though it’s home to only one native species, California has nonetheless adopted the palm as a quintessential icon. But a new snake in California’s palm tree-lined garden may soon put all that to the test. Dozens of palms in San Diego’s Sweetwater Summit Regional Park, about 10 miles from the Mexican border, are looking more like sad, upside-down umbrellas than the usual bursts of botanical joy. The offender is the South American palm weevil, a recent arrival to the U.S. that’s long been widespread in the tropics. Large, black, shiny, and possessed of an impressive proboscis (nose), the weevil prefers the king of palms, the Canary Island date palm, also known as the “pineapple palm” for the distinctive way it’s typically pruned. A palm tree is basically a gigantic cake-pop, an enormous ball of veggie goodness on a stick. The adult female palm weevil uses her long snout to drill tunnels into that goodness—known to science as the “apical meristem” and to your grocer as the “heart” of the palm—where she lays her eggs. When her larvae hatch, their food is all around them. And they start to eat. If the South American palm weevil consolidates its foothold in California, then the worst might still be to come. While these weevils generally stick to the Canary Island palms, they can harbor a parasitic worm that causes red-ring disease—a fatal infection that can strike almost any palm, including the state’s precious native, the California fan. --- Where do South American Palm Weevils come from? Originally, Brazil and Argentina. They’ve become common wherever there are Canary Island Palm trees, however, which includes Europe, the Mediterranean, the Middle East. --- How do they kill palm trees? Their larvae eat the apical meristem, which is the sweet part of the plant sometimes harvested and sold commercially as the “heart of palm.” --- How do you get rid of them? If the palm weevils infest a tree, it’s very hard to save it, since they live on the inside, where they escape both detection and pesticides. Neighboring palm trees can be sprayed for protection. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/06/20/a-real-alien-invasion-is-coming-to-a-palm-tree-near-you ---+ For more information: Visit the UC Riverside Center for invasive Species Research: http://cisr.ucr.edu/invasive_species.html ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Decorator Crabs Make High Fashion at Low Tide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwQcv7TyX04 Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Snail Sex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOcLaI44TXA ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Gross Science: Meet The Frog That Barfs Up Its Babies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xfX_NTrFRM Brain Craft: Mutant Menu: If you could, would you design your DNA? And should you be able to? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrDM6Ic2xMM ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

11 meses atrás

These Fish Are All About Sex on the Beach | Deep Look

During the highest tides, California grunion stampede out of the ocean to mate on the beach. When the party's over, thousands of tiny eggs are left stranded up in the sand. How will their lost babies make it back to the sea? SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * With summer just around the corner, Southern California beaches are ready to welcome the yearly arrival of some very unique and amorous guests. That’s right, the grunion are running! California grunion are fish that spend their lives in the ocean. But when the tides are at their highest during spring and summer, grunion make a trip up onto beaches to mate and lay eggs. Grunion mate on beaches throughout southern California and down into into Mexico. The grunion runs have taken on a special importance to coastal communities Santa Barbara to San Diego. For some, coming out to see the grunion run has been an annual tradition for generations. For others it’s a rare chance to catch ocean fish with their bare hands. --- What are grunion? California grunion are schooling fish similar to sardines that live in the Pacific Ocean that emerge from the sea to lay their eggs on the sand of beaches in Southern California and down the Baja California Peninsula in Mexico. There are also smaller populations in Monterey Bay and San Francisco Bay. Another species, the Gulf Grunion lays their eggs in the northern shores of the Gulf of California. California Grunion are typically about six inches in length. --- Why do grunion mate on land? The ocean is full of predators who would like to gobble up a tasty fish egg. The grunion eggs tend to be safer up on the beach if they can make it there without raising the attention of predators like birds and raccoons. Grunion eggs have a tough outer layer that keeps them from drying out or being crushed by the sand. --- When do California grunion run? California grunion typically spawn from March to August. The fishing season is closed during the peak spawning times during May and June. See https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/fishing/ocean/grunion#28352306-2017-runs for more detailed info on grunion seasons. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2017/06/06/these-fish-are-all-about-sex-on-the-beach-deep-look/ ---+ For more information: http://www.grunion.org/ ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak2xqH5h0YY Sticky. Stretchy. Waterproof. The Amazing Underwater Tape of the Caddisfly | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3BHrzDHoYo The Amazing Life of Sand | Deep Look https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkrQ9QuKprE&list=PLdKlciEDdCQDxBs0SZgTMqhszst1jqZhp&index=51 ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! How Much Plastic is in the Ocean? | It's Okay To Be Smart https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFZS3Vh4lfI White Sand Beaches Are Made of Fish Poop | Gross Science https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SfxgY1dIM4 What Physics Teachers Get Wrong About Tides! | Space Time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwChk4S99i4 ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, serves the people of Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. Home to one of the most listened-to public radio station in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program, KQED is also a leader and innovator in interactive media and technology, taking people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the David B. Gold Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

11 meses atrás

Behind the Scenes With Deep Look: The Diva Decorator Crabs

How long does it take to film a decorator crab putting on its seaweed hat? Hint: It's days, not hours. The Deep Look team is back with a second behind the scenes video! Get to know host Lauren Sommer and producers Gabriela Quiros, Josh Cassidy and Elliott Kennerson as we put together our episode on decorator crabs and reflect on the joys and challenges of making nature films. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Get a new perspective on our place in the universe and meet extraordinary new friends. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. * NEW VIDEOS EVERY OTHER TUESDAY! * ---+ Episodes Featured in this video: The Snail-Smashing, Fish-Spearing, Eye-Popping Mantis Shrimp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm1ChtK9QDU Everything You Never Wanted to Know About Snail Sex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOcLaI44TXA These Termites Turn Your House into a Palace of Poop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYPQ1Tjp0ew Decorator Crabs Make High Fashion at Low Tide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwQcv7TyX04 Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj8pFX9SOXE Why Does Your Cat's Tongue Feel Like Sandpaper? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9h_QtLol75I How Mosquitoes Use Six Needles to Suck Your Blood https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD8SmacBUcU The Bombardier Beetle And Its Crazy Chemical Cannon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWwgLS5tK80 This Pulsating Slime Mold Comes in Peace (ft. It's Okay to Be Smart) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nx3Uu1hfl6Q Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak2xqH5h0YY These 'Resurrection Plants' Spring Back to Life in Seconds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoFGKlZMo2g Nature's Mood Rings: How Chameleons Really Change Color https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kp9W-_W8rCM Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3CtGoqz3ww If Your Hands Could Smell, You’d Be an Octopus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXMxihOh8ps How Do Pelicans Survive Their Death-Defying Dives? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfEboMmwAMw ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is also supported by HopeLab, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Smart Family Foundation and the members of KQED.

1 ano e 3 dias atrás